Don’t give Gen Z bad digital experiences

How you handle email responses is important to an excellent customer experience

In his latest article, digital marketing leader Ryan Phelan challenges marketers to rethink their email management practices generated by their campaigns. Many of the emails that respond to campaign messages are automated replies, such as NDRs or external messages. But some emails are written with the expectation of being read.

Of course, this also includes login requests and other hostile messages. But there can also be positive messages – comments or questions, for example – that deserve an answer. This is where response management comes into play. “You may not need to see 95 responses in 100 emails sent after a campaign has been sent,” Phelan writes. But the other five can sign requests or comments. Sometimes people answer questions about products in their email or ask for help with issues with their business. Because? Because you can be new to online shopping. Find out why you should track the responses people send in your email campaigns – it helps you see what’s bothering your customers.

Large customer-backed email teams need to be able to handle the logistics of reviewing a large number of responses, especially since most of them will be irrelevant. Smaller teams may not be the challenge, but they should at least see how their email platform handles the response feature. B2B teams usually process small amounts of emails and these responses should be completely personalized.

Test my theory, marketers. Respond to some automated or campaign emails in your inbox. See what you get in return. A personal answer? An automated response that tells you how to register or how to get a personalized response? Nothing? Pay attention to the customer’s expectations for a personal relationship. If you ignore your answers, you ignore the opportunity to grow.

Generation Z is looking forward to bad digital experiences

This week, the Sitecore digital experience platform launched the second in a series of studies to see how the current environment is affecting marketing and consumers (you can read the results of the first survey here). Based on a survey of 1,000 Generation Z consumers, Sitecore identified significant impatience among brands that offer a poor digital experience.

• 63% do not tolerate slow or unstable locations;

• 57% are less loyal to brands than before the pandemic;

• 37% will interrupt a purchase or post a negative review if the digital experience is bad.

Less than half of respondents said they would give brands more than two options before turning to a competitor. On the other hand, 76% expected brands to reward them if they remained loyal. Finally, no less than 83% see online shopping as an experience and not a transaction.

Why do we care? Generation Z refers more clearly to people born between 1997 and around 2012 or 2015. The elderly are 20 years old. They are a native digital generation and, thanks to the pandemic, they now spend almost all of their time in the digital world, especially as consumers. The demand for quick engagement, good experiences, and perfect negotiations will only grow – and digital disruptors, from Amazon to Uber to Airbnb, are demanding. None of this is going to change.

Google Ads will launch dynamic opt-out lists in the coming weeks

To help brands better see almost unwanted content, Google creates a dynamic exclusion list. Google has learned that advertisers provide feedback on how difficult and time-consuming it is to maintain business exclusion lists. Therefore, the solution is a dynamic option that keeps these lists up to date.

Prior to this update, Google Ads advertiser management options allowed search marketers to exclude certain sites, content types, and topics from entire campaigns. At the moment, however, many advertisers and especially smaller companies are not following.

The new solution “allows advertisers and agencies to create their own exclusion lists or use lists from trusted third parties, such as brand safety organizations and industry groups, which may be perfectly up to date,” tweeted Ginny Marvin about an advertising product.

Why do we care?

As Internet content changes and evolves, it is critical that advertisers maintain the exclusions they need to ensure that their brands do not appear alongside content that does not match their message. Dynamic opt-out lists can make your brand live easier, requiring less time and attention from the advertiser.

Generation Z is looking forward to bad digital experiences

The Sitecore digital experience platform is conducting a series of surveys for the second time this week on the impact of the current environment on marketers and consumers (you can read the results of the first question here). Based on a survey of 1,000 Generation Z consumers, Sitecore identified significant impatience among brands that offer a poor digital experience.

• 63% are impatient with the slowness of a building that is not working;

• 57% are less loyal to brands than before that pandemic;

• 37% would buy a negative review if the digital experience occurred.

Less than half of respondents said their brand would give them more than two options before making a choice at the same time. On the other hand, 76% expect these brands to remain true to themselves. Ten blocks consider a solid 83% online discount to be an experience, not a bargain.

Why are we interested? By most definitions, Generation Z includes people born between 1997 and approximately from 2012 to 2015. The elderly are 20 years old. It is an original digital generation and, thanks to the pandemic, they almost always bring it to the digital world, mainly as a consumer. The demand for fast engagement, good experiences, and ongoing negotiations will only grow and digital revolutionaries, from Amazon to Uber and Airbnb, are raising the bar. Not everything will change.

Google Ads will launch dynamic opt-out lists in the coming weeks

To make it easier to view unwanted content, Google is implementing dynamic exclusion lists.

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