Don’t miss the upcoming keynotes at MarTech

Join MarTech Speakers Scott Brinker, Kim Davis, Editor-in-Chief of MarTech Today, and Author and CEO Nancy Duarte from March 16-17 for FREE professional training on critical marketing challenges and activities.

Together with thousands of marketers, you will discover actionable tactics to use data and make informed decisions that drive direction, conversion, and revenue while delivering exceptional customer experiences.

Win a free pass for MarTech and Nancy conference chairs, register your details. Read on for your exclusive preview …

Your data. Everywhere. We monitor clock speeds, users, leads, inventory, and even find love through data. In just ten years, data has become essential to all business functions. But … does data speed up or slow down critical business decisions? Is there a way to find the problem or opportunity in the data and communicate it in a way that generates real traction?

In short: yes.

By covering the structure of a story, you create a clear, meaningful, and fact-based story that leads to decision-making. Historical structures identify and humanize emotions in their data, drive internal initiatives, and help connect customers to their brand.

This data communication method was discovered after checking thousands of slides with data from different global quality brands. In this lesson, you will learn how the best brands adapt, present, and improve their data so that they not only understand the data but also gain meaning.

If you watch Nancy’s speeches, you can:

• Understand the story

• Structure the story in the data

• Choose the most powerful action you can take

• Humanize who generates the data

• Marvel at the size of a number

• Create tension by revealing the data

You can also unlock Nancy’s free discounts, which include access to her online course ($ 129!) And an e-book on virtual communication.

What are marketing activities?

This is the most difficult time. I have a column for Marketing Land and MarTech Today. As you will read below, it’s because I don’t know what the topic is. I hope not to confuse the water anymore.

We must speak of “marketing activities”. For example, I find the term so broad and contradictory that I don’t trust it. I often say this when I hear someone talking about marketing. They even talk about marketing automation – automated emails, text messages, and other messages. While it’s difficult to better define the term for more than one of these titles, we need to at least explore the connection with marketing technology.

I first encountered this issue when I had to enter my job title and job description when taking on the role of Marketing Technology Manager at Western Governors University. At the time, my boss and I only knew we needed someone to monitor and manage our tech inventory – a role in the orchestra/orchestra – but we didn’t know the Martech community as we know it today. If I’m looking for a job similar to the one we’ve suggested, it usually means I need to automate marketing when I see work for a marketing department. We already had a team for this, so it didn’t work out.

If we look at how other marketing activities define it, it is clear that the nature of the current definition is vague. Below are two opinion-makers who note the connection between the term and marketing automation.

HubSpot’s Kayla Carmicheal defines it as (emphasis): “In general, marketing activities define the team responsible for the technology and processes needed to make marketing teams function effectively.”

Michael McNeal, of Centric Consulting, explains: “Marketing activities go beyond the marketing automation platform, they involve people, processes, and technology.”

It is true that marketing automation encompasses many different aspects, from technology to strategy and analytics. In some small organizations, a marketing automation platform can cover most needs and will likely require a large portion of the martech stack, but that’s not the case everywhere. If marketing activities are related to a wide variety of marketing, as some argue, it is problematic to use it as a synonym for marketing automation. Hence the confusion, at least for me.

There is something I’m sure of. Marketing, automation, and technology activities are all interrelated. Perhaps a Venn diagram, each formed by a slightly circular circle, is the best model to consider.

While others, such as Carmicheal and McNeal, discuss marketing activities, it is clear that the practice goes beyond technology and automation. For example, they both mention a human component. This can include aspects of human resources and project management. Of course, someone in management takes care of the staffing needs of one department, but not the entire marketing team manages the other from an HR perspective. They can certainly advise management on the skills teams need to fulfill their mandate, as well as help manage projects and changes so projects run smoothly and are more likely to be accepted by stakeholders. So if someone works in marketing, what kind of people do we hire?

In light of all of this, I advise the marketing community to define exactly what marketing activities are. If we use the term so often, we need to be able to define it better.

What are marketing activities?

This is the most difficult time. I have a column for Marketing Land and MarTech Today. As you will read below, it’s because I don’t know what the topic is. I hope not to confuse the water anymore.

We must speak of “marketing activities”. For example, I find the term so broad and contradictory that I don’t trust it. I often say this when I hear someone talking about marketing. They even talk about marketing automation – automated emails, text messages, and other messages. While it’s difficult to better define the term for more than one of these titles, we need to at least explore the connection with marketing technology.

I first encountered this issue when I had to enter my job title and job description when taking on the role of Marketing Technology Manager at Western Governors University. At the time, my boss and I only knew we needed someone to monitor and manage our tech inventory – a role in the orchestra/orchestra – but we didn’t know the Martech community as we know it today.

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