IAB Tech Lab unveils proposed privacy standards

Launched a year ago, the AB Tech Lab Rearc project was rewarded today with the announcement of a portfolio of proposed standards. The IAB asks for comments and feedback. The standards meet the challenge of Bill Tucker, Executive Director of Partnership for Responsible Addressable Media (PRAM), who participated in Project Rear.

 The standards. Specifications and best practices consist of two platforms and two versions.

• The responsibility platform aims to ensure that all participants in the ecosystem can meet user preferences. It contains specifications for open and verifiable data structures and standard practices.

• The global privacy platform is designed to provide users with reliable transparency and control over their data and to support effective compliance by industry participants in an environment where regulations vary from region to region and regulatory development continues.

• Vendor-defined taxonomy and data transparency standards that support valid and contextual guidelines are an attempt to clean up contextual inventory if content and placement specifications are inconsistent when inventory is available.

• User activity best practices provide security and privacy guidelines for identifying information related to an email address or phone number provided by the user.

Google intervention. User activity best practices were an expected part of the Project Rearc standards. Maps are at the heart of the solutions offered by a wide variety of data readers and techs, including The Trade Desk, LiveRamp, Infutor, and Neustar.

What was the unambiguous step in defining best practices for tokens was interrupted by Google’s announcement that it would allow any kind of detection by weakening third-party cookies, even when the initial crawl begins. It’s voluntary. offered by the user. Google has said it will not create or use alternate IDs to track users around the web.

Outlook for the portfolio. With the exception of the standards for identity marks, the other proposals seem – at least to a large extent – to be acceptable to all parties. The best practices identified by the target audience based on the context defined by the company are intended to support banner-free advertising.

Google was invited by PRAM to discuss the proposals. Google’s favorite FLoC initiative clearly disrupts online behavior, but it stores and manages data together, not as personal data.

The urgent problem is that the treatment of media problems is seriously interrupted. It is necessary to find good solutions to promote the economic model of digital marketing.

Disappointing words from Bill Tucker, EPA group leader in data, technology, and benchmarking at ANA and executive director of Responsible Addressable Media Partnership. The concern is caused by the general threat of targeted advertising and marketing due to the increasing emphasis on user privacy. More specifically, it is caused by the threat of third-party cookies.

Some browsers – Safari and Mozilla Firefox – no longer support third-party cookies. Google’s announcement that it will also block these cookies in Chrome within two years (i.e. by the end of 2021) has generated a string of responses from martech, adtech, advertisers, and publishers.

To be clear, there is no threat to the cookies themselves or the cookies used by websites to collect information about users who have chosen to interact with them.

The AB Tech Lab Rearc project, launched a year ago, was rewarded today with the announcement of a portfolio of proposed standards. The IAB asks for comments and feedback. The standards meet the challenge of Bill Tucker, executive director of Partnership for Responsible Addressable Media (PRAM), who participated in Project Rear.

Tucker said: ‘The urgent problem is that there will be significant disruptions in the functioning of reactionary media companies. We need to find good solutions to promote the business model for digital marketing.

The standards. The specifications and best practices consist of two platforms and two versions.

• The accountability platform aims to ensure that all participants in the ecosystem can meet user preferences. Contains specifications for open and verifiable data structures and standard practices.

• The global privacy platform is designed to provide users with reliable transparency and control over their data and to support effective compliance by industry participants in an environment where regulations differ from region to region and regulatory development continues.

• Provider-defined taxonomy and data transparency standards that support valid and contextual guidelines are an attempt to clear contextual inventory if content and placement specifications are inconsistent when inventory is available.

• User Activity’s best practices provide security and privacy guidelines for identifying information related to an email address or telephone number provided by the user.

Google intervention. Best practices for user activity were an expected part of the Project Rearc standards. Maps are at the core of the solutions offered by a wide range of data readers and ad techs, including The Trade Desk, LiveRamp, Infutor, and Neustar.

What was the unequivocal step in defining best practices for tokens was interrupted by Google’s announcement that it would allow any form of detection, which would jeopardize third-party cookies, even when the initial crossing begins. It is voluntary. offered by the user. Google has said it will not create or use alternative IDs to track users on the internet.

“People do not have to accept Internet tracking to take advantage of relevant ads,” a Google spokesman said.

Prospects for the portfolio. With the exception of the standards for identity marks, the other proposals – at least to a large extent – seem acceptable to all parties. The best practices identified by the target audience, based on the context defined by the business, are aimed at supporting banner-free advertising.

Google was invited by PRAM to discuss the proposals. Google’s preferred FLoC initiative clearly interrupts online behavior, but it stores and manages data together, not as personal data.

The death of cookies and the threat to digital marketing

The urgent problem is that the treatment of media problems is seriously disrupted. Good solutions must be found to promote the economic model of digital marketing.

Disappointing words from Bill Tucker, EPA group leader in data, technology, and benchmarking at ANA and executive director of the Responsible Addressable Media Partnership. The concern is caused by the general threat of targeted advertising and marketing due to the increasing emphasis on the privacy of users. More specifically, it is caused by the threat of third-party cookies.

Some browsers – Safari and Mozilla Firefox – no longer support third-party cookies. Google’s announcement that it will also block these cookies in Chrome within two years (i.e. by the end of 2021) has generated a series of responses from martech, adtech, advertisers, and publishers.

To be clear, there is no threat to the cookies themselves or the cookies used by websites to collect information about users who have chosen to communicate with them.

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